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Lua error in Module:Unicode_data at line 290: attempt to index local 'data_module' (a boolean value). was a Lua error in Module:Unicode_data at line 290: attempt to index local 'data_module' (a boolean value). after Meitoku and before Shōchō. This period started in July 1394 and ended in April 1428.[1] During this time, the emperors were Lua error in Module:Unicode_data at line 290: attempt to index local 'data_module' (a boolean value).[2] and Lua error in Module:Unicode_data at line 290: attempt to index local 'data_module' (a boolean value)..[3]

Events of the Ōei era

In the 26th year of Ōei, Tsushima Island was invaded by Korean military forces. 15th century map by Sin Suk-ju
  • 27 August 1394 (Ōei 1, 1st day of the 7th month): Former-Emperor Chōkei died.[4]
  • 1398 (Ōei 5): Kinkaku-ji or "Gold Pavillion" is built by Ashikaga Yoshimitsu.[5]
  • September 1398 (Ōei 5, 8th month): In the 6th year of the reign of King Taejong of Joseon, a Korean diplomatic mission was received in Japan.[6]
  • 1399 (Ōei 6): Lua error in Module:Unicode_data at line 290: attempt to index local 'data_module' (a boolean value). began. Ōuchi Yoshiharu raised an army against Shogun Ashikaga Yoshimitsu.[1]
  • 1401 (Ōei 8, 2nd month): The Imperial Palace was destroyed by fire.[7]
  • 1402 (Ōei 9): A letter from the emperor of China was received by Yoshimitsu; and this formal communication mistakenly gives the title "king of Japan" to the Japanese shogun.[8]
  • 1419 (Ōei 26) : Lua error in Module:Unicode_data at line 290: attempt to index local 'data_module' (a boolean value). was a Joseon military action in Tsushima Province (Tsushima Island). More than 200 ships and 17,000 fighting men took part in this military expedition.[1]
  • 10 May 1424 (Ōei 31, 12th day of the 4th month): Former-Emperor Go-Kameyama died.[9]

Related pages

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric (2002). Japan Encyclopedia. Harvard University Press. p. 735. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5 . https://books.google.com/?id=p2QnPijAEmEC&pg=PA735. 
  2. Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric (2002). Japan Encyclopedia. Harvard University Press. p. 255. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5 . https://books.google.com/?id=p2QnPijAEmEC&pg=PA255. 
  3. Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric (2002). Japan Encyclopedia. Harvard University Press. p. 883. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5 . https://books.google.com/?id=p2QnPijAEmEC&pg=PA883. 
  4. Japan Society of London (1928). Transactions and Proceedings of the Japan Society, London. Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner and Company. p. 38. https://books.google.com/?id=XpUzAAAAIAAJ. 
  5. Asian Historical Architecture, "Kinkaku-ji Temple - 金閣寺 (built 1398, destroyed 1950, reconstructed 1955) "; retrieved 2012-4-27.
  6. Kang, Etsuko Hae-Jin (1997). Diplomacy and Ideology in Japanese-Korean Relations: From the Fifteenth to the Eighteenth Century. Palgrave Macmillan. p. 275. ISBN 978-0-312-17370-8 . https://books.google.com/?id=4f0jnNzdRb4C&pg=PA275. 
  7. Klaproth, Julius von (1834). Nipon o dai itsi ran: ou Annales des empereurs du Japon. Oriental Translation Fund. p. 323. https://books.google.com/?id=18oNAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA323. 
  8. Klaproth, Julius von (1834). Nipon o dai itsi ran: ou Annales des empereurs du Japon. Oriental Translation Fund. p. 324. https://books.google.com/?id=18oNAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA324. 
  9. Richard Arthur Brabazon Ponsonby-Fane (1931). Kyoto: the Old Capital of Japan, 794-1869. Ponsonby Memorial Society. p. 185. https://books.google.com/?id=kG1DAAAAYAAJ. 

Other websites

Ōei 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th
1394 1395 1396 1397 1398 1399 1400 1401 1402 1403 1404 1405 1406 1407 1408 1409 1410 1411 1412 1413
Ōei 21st 22nd 23rd 24th 25th 26th 27th 28th 29th 30th 31st 32th 33th 34th 35th
1414 1415 1416 1417 1418 1419 1420 1421 1422 1423 1424 1425 1426 1427 1428
Preceded by:
Meitoku
Era or nengō:
Ōei
Succeeded by:
Shōchō