kidzsearch.com > wiki   Explore:web images videos games  

Tasuku Honjo




KidzSearch Safe Wikipedia for Kids.
Jump to: navigation, search
Tasuku Honjo
Tasuku Honjo in 2018
Born (1942-01-27) January 27, 1942 (age 78)
Kyoto, Japan
NationalityJapanese
FieldsMolecular Immunology
InstitutionsKyoto University
Alma materKyoto University
Doctoral advisorYasutomi Nishizuka
Osamu Hayaishi
Known forClass switch recombination
IL-4, IL-5, AID
Cancer immunotherapy
PD-1
Notable awardsImperial Prize (1996)
Koch Prize (2012)
Order of Culture (2013)
Tang Prize (2014)
Kyoto Prize (2016)
Alpert Prize (2017)
Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (2018)
This person won a Nobel Prize
Tasuku Honjo (本庶 佑 Honjo Tasuku?, born January 27, 1942) is a Japanese immunologist. He is best known for his work of finding and naming the Programmed Cell Death Protein 1 (PD-1).[1]

He is also known for his discovery of cytokines: IL-4 and IL-5,[2] as well as the discovery of Activation-induced Cytidine Deaminase (AID).[3]

He was elected as a foreign associate of the National Academy of Sciences in 2001. He is a member of German Academy of Natural Scientists Leopoldina (2003), and also as a member of the Japan Academy (2005).

In 2018, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine along with James P. Allison.[4]

References

  1. Ishida, Y.; Agata, Y.; Shibahara, K.; Honjo, T. (1992). "Induced expression of PD-1, a novel member of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily, upon programmed cell death.". The EMBO Journal (Wiley) 11 (11): 3887–3895. doi:10.1002/j.1460-2075.1992.tb05481.x . ISSN 0261-4189 . PMC 556898 . PMID 1396582 . 
  2. Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Ogata, Masato (2010-03-25). "The study of cytokines by Japanese researchers: a historical perspective". International Immunology 22 (5): 341–345. doi:10.1093/intimm/dxq022 . ISSN 0953-8178 . PMID 20338911 . https://academic.oup.com/intimm/article/22/5/341/731160. Retrieved 2018-10-01. 
  3. Robert Koch Foundation confers award on Professors Honjo and Wimmer
  4. Hannah, Devlin. "James P Allison and Tasuku Honjo win Nobel prize for medicine". The Guardian. https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/oct/01/james-p-allison-and-tasuku-honjo-win-nobel-prize-for-medicine. Retrieved 1 October 2018.