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Tokugawa shogunate




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The Tokugawa Shogunate had its center in Edo castle.

The Tokugawa shogunate, also known as the Tokugawa bakufu (徳川幕府?), and the Edo bakufu (江戸幕府?), was a feudal Japanese military government.[1] The heads of government were the shoguns.[2] Each was a member of the Tokugawa clan.[3]

These years are known as the Edo period. The period takes its name from the city where the Tokugawa shoguns lived.[4] This time is also called the Tokugawa period[1] or pre-modern (Kinsei).[5]

History

In 1603, Tokugawa Ieyasu took office as Shogun, and established a military government in Edo, now Tokyo.[1]

List of the Tokugawa shoguns

  1. Tokugawa Ieyasu, r. 1603–1605[6]
  2. Tokugawa Hidetada, r. 1605–1623[3]
  3. Tokugawa Iemitsu, r. 1623–1651[3]
  4. Tokugawa Ietsuna, r. 1651–1680[7]
  5. Tokugawa Tsunayoshi, r. 1680–1709[8]
  6. Tokugawa Ienobu, r. 1709–1712[7]
  7. Tokugawa Ietsugu, r. 1713–1716[1]
  8. Tokugawa Yoshimune, r. 1716–1745[8]
  9. Tokugawa Ieshige, r. 1745–1760[7]
  10. Tokugawa Ieharu, r. 1760–1786[3]
  11. Tokugawa Ienari, r. 1787–1837[7]
  12. Tokugawa Ieyoshi, r. 1837–1853[1]
  13. Tokugawa Iesada, r. 1853–1858[7]
  14. Tokugawa Iemochi, r. 1858–1866[7]
  15. Tokugawa Yoshinobu, r. 1866–1867[9]

Related pages

References

The hollyhock symbol of the Tokugawa family.
  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric (2002). Japan Encyclopedia. Harvard University Press. p. 978. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5 . https://books.google.com/?id=p2QnPijAEmEC&pg=PA978. 
  2. Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric (2002). Japan Encyclopedia. Harvard University Press. pp. 878-879. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5 . https://books.google.com/?id=p2QnPijAEmEC&pg=PA878. 
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric (2002). Japan Encyclopedia. Harvard University Press. p. 976. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5 . https://books.google.com/?id=p2QnPijAEmEC&pg=PA976. 
  4. Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric (2002). Japan Encyclopedia. Harvard University Press. p. 167. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5 . https://books.google.com/?id=p2QnPijAEmEC&pg=PA167. 
  5. Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric (2002). Japan Encyclopedia. Harvard University Press. p. 525. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5 . https://books.google.com/?id=p2QnPijAEmEC&pg=PA525. 
  6. Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric (2002). Japan Encyclopedia. Harvard University Press. pp. 977-978. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5 . https://books.google.com/?id=p2QnPijAEmEC&pg=PA977. 
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric (2002). Japan Encyclopedia. Harvard University Press. p. 977. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5 . https://books.google.com/?id=p2QnPijAEmEC&pg=PA977. 
  8. 8.0 8.1 Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric (2002). Japan Encyclopedia. Harvard University Press. p. 979. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5 . https://books.google.com/?id=p2QnPijAEmEC&pg=PA979. 
  9. Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric (2002). Japan Encyclopedia. Harvard University Press. pp. 979-780. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5 . https://books.google.com/?id=p2QnPijAEmEC&pg=PA979. 

Other websites

Media related to Tokugawa Shoguns at Wikimedia Commons




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